Blog Archives

New strategy! New crowd! New team!

https://blogs.loc.gov/thesignal/2018/10/new-strategy-new-crowd-new-team/ Big news! We’ll launch a crowdsourcing program at the Library of Congress on October 24. We’re asking everyone to join us as we improve discovery and access across our diverse collections through transcription and tagging. The program is grounded

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Posted in Classification, Libraries, Open Data

Jack Delano’s Color Photos of Chicago’s Rail Yards in the 1940s

I wanted to share this article I found from The Atlantic, which contains a collection of 21 high resolution color photographs taken by Jack Delano (1914 – 1997), a photographer who traveled through America’s countryside in the early 1940s, hoping

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Posted in Archives

One College’s Approach To Ethical Subject Headings

The University Libraries at the University of Colorado Boulder recently decided they weren’t going to wait around for our national government to stop using the term “illegal aliens” as a subject heading in the Library of Congress. While they won’t

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Posted in Cataloging, Library

Crowd-sourcing challenges to the LCSH

As I was conducting research on alternative cataloging practices, I came across a project by Violet Fox, a librarian and cataloger in central Michigan.  Fox was inspired to develop a website aimed at crowd sourcing challenges to the notoriously static

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Posted in Cataloging

The Constitution’s taxonomy of officers and offices

https://www.washingtonpost.com/news/volokh-conspiracy/wp/2017/09/25/the-emoluments-clauses-litigation-part-1-the-constitutions-taxonomy-of-officers-and-offices/?utm_term=.17f151f1bbe7 This articles details the hierarchical taxonomy of the offices of the United States of America, specifically the Office of the Presidency and the other offices of the Executive and Legislative branches. What this article examines is how various versions

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Posted in Cataloging, Classification, Knowledge Structures, Libraries, Library

OCLC: replace FAST heading “Illegal aliens”

In July 2014, students and librarians from Dartmouth College submitted a proposal to change the Library of Congress Subject Heading (LCSH) Illegal aliens and associated headings such as Children of illegal aliens. LC rejected that proposal in December 2014. The American Library Association

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Posted in Cataloging, Classification, Libraries

The Library of Congress released a history of card catalogs

The Library of Congress has released a book on the history of the card catalog, appropriately titled The Card Catalog. This Vox article talks about what the author, Constance Grady, learned from reading the book. She describes the earliest known catalog, the destruction

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Posted in Cataloging, Library

Lost and Hidden Cultural Treasures in Archives Waiting to be Discovered

While “wild” and “discovery” are not words people typically associate with conducting research in archives, libraries, and museums, maybe they are more relevant than we might at first think. Turpin points out in his introduction to the University Of Iowa Press’ first edition print, as part of their Iowa Whitman Series, that like Life and Adventures of Jack Engle, “plenty of American authors have left books in the dark” (xiv), which leaves me to wonder what other great works are hidden and tucked away in archives that we are yet to discover. This sense of uncertainty of what items and treasures may lie in our collections still waiting to discovered, make archives, libraries, and museums, a tad wild. — And what’s not to like about that?

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Posted in Archives, Books, Libraries, Library

Radical librarianship: NYT interviews Carla Hayden

“Once you learn to read, you will be forever free.” – Frederick Douglass (quoted by Carla Hayden) In this piece from The New York Times, Ana Marie Cox interviews the recently appointed 14th librarian of Congress, Carla Hayden. Ms. Hayden explores

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Posted in Library

Can Twitter Fit Inside the Library of Congress?

Six years after announcing plans to archive Twitter, the Library of Congress continues to struggle in this unlikely partnership. As of today, there’s still no tweet archive and no set launch date. Instead, unprocessed tweets are saved to a server, collected but

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Posted in Archives, Cataloging, Library, Open Data

by Hugh McLeod

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Pratt Institute School of Information