Blog Archives

From Conveyor Belt to Conservation Policies

Digitization at the National Herbarium The United States National Herbarium, part of the Smithsonian National Museum of Natural History, contains approximately 5 million pressed plant specimens.  These specimens date back as far as the 1840s, having been collected during early

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Posted in Museums, Open Data

Wikidata and Digital Preservation

After finishing  my term paper surveying Wikidata adoption across GLAM, I wanted to look more closely into the final GLAM project I discussed in my overview. While Wikidata is exciting for plenty of reasons, I am especially curious about Yale

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Posted in Archives, Linked Open Data, Open Data

Mapping Paintings

This past summer, Boston University professor Jodi Cranston created Mapping Paintings. Hyperallergic describes Mapping Paintings as “an open-source, searchable platform for compiling provenance data for individual artworks (not just paintings, despite its name), from owners to past locations to details of

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Posted in Museums, Open Access, Open Data, Uncategorized

Folksonomies and OpenStreetMap

During my research for the final group project, I came across some very interesting research on Folksonomies, OpenStreetMap (OSM), and Volunteered Geographic Information (VGI). I have a deep love of maps and a new interest in folksonomies, so this was

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Posted in Cataloging, Open Data

The Internet’s Own Boy: The Story of Aaron Swartz

This documentary “depicts the life of American computer programmer, writer, political organizer and Internet activist Aaron Swartz. It features interviews with his family and friends as well as the internet luminaries who worked with him. The film tells his story up

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Posted in DRAFT - Repeat, Knowledge and Truth, Open Access, Open Data

The Metropolitan Museum of Art: 375,000 windows on art history, and that’s just the beginning

  Richard Knipel, the Wikimedian in residence at the Metropolitan Museum of Art, looks back at the efforts made and future plans to further support collaboration between the museum and the Wikimedia movement. By Richard Knipel, July 25th, 2017 Six months ago, I

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Posted in Museums, Open Data

#MeToo, #YoTambién, #MoiAussi

Data Visualization credit to Erin Gallagher, Medium@Erin_Gallagher For most of us, social tagging is a de facto part of everyday life. We tag pictures of beautifully arranged food (#HomecookedDinner), of our pets (#Fluffy), even of ourselves (#WokeUpLikeThis), all for the

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Posted in Knowledge and Truth, Open Data

Organizing Data for Accountability: The Washington Post Tracks Fatal Police Shootings in the U.S.

Beginning in 2015, the Washington Post has been compiling a database of fatal police shootings in the United States. According to their methodology, they have been combing through “local news reports, law enforcement websites and social media,” as well as

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Posted in Cataloging, Open Data, Research Projects, Uncategorized

The unexpected boon of impermanence

In a world of CCTV cameras on every corner, and smartphones in every hand, we’re living in a time with unprecedented amounts of data. Unfortunately, it isn’t always easy to see how to parse and use this data in a

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Posted in Archives, Classification, Open Data

When Data Becomes Information: Hurricane Harvey

As Hurricane Harvey has finally begun its denouement in Texas and the massive cleanup effort begins, news outlets are reporting on several ingenious social media search-and-rescue tools.  I’ll highlight two examples here, both of which show the power of turning

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Posted in Classification, Knowledge Structures, Open Data

by Hugh McLeod

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Pratt Institute School of Information