Blog Archives

The Internet’s Own Boy: The Story of Aaron Swartz

This documentary “depicts the life of American computer programmer, writer, political organizer and Internet activist Aaron Swartz. It features interviews with his family and friends as well as the internet luminaries who worked with him. The film tells his story up

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Posted in DRAFT - Repeat, Knowledge and Truth, Open Access, Open Data

Bibliotheca Universalis by Conrad Gesner

__ Conrad Gessner (also Konrad Gesner, Conrad Geßner, Conrad von Gesner, Conradus Gesnerus, Conrad Gesner; 26 March 1516 – 13 December 1565) was a Swiss naturalist and bibliographer. He was well known as a botanist, physician and classical linguist. His

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Posted in Cataloging, DRAFT - Repeat, Library

Remember Aaron Swartz (November 8, 1986-January 11, 2013)

Guerilla Open Access Manifesto Information is power. But like all power, there are those who want to keep it for themselves. The world’s entire scientific and cultural heritage, published over centuries in books and journals, is increasingly being digitized and

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Posted in DRAFT - Repeat, Open Data

Linked Open Data — What is it?

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Posted in DRAFT - Repeat, LODLAM

Another Word for ‘Illegal Alien’ at the Library of Congress: Contentious

WASHINGTON — Melissa Padilla was doing research on immigration in her university library at Dartmouth College when she noticed the term “illegal aliens” popping up again and again. The more she saw it, the angrier she became. “This term, and

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Posted in Cataloging, Classification, DRAFT - Repeat, Library

What Does Jorge Luis Borges’ “Library of Babel” Look Like?

Programmer Jamie Zawinski has created a digital rendering of the infinite, hexagonal library that is the subject and setting of Jorge Luis Borges’s short story “The Library of Babel.” In his famous short story “The Library of Babel,” Argentine author

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Posted in DRAFT - Repeat, Library

Why 19th-Century Naturalists Didn’t Believe in the Platypus

George Shaw’s depiction of a duck-billed platypus from 1809. (Photo: New York Public Library) In his laboratory study in 1799, biologist George Shaw stared down at his new specimen in disbelief. The creature from the colony of New South Wales

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Posted in Classification, DRAFT - Repeat

LOCATION, LOCATION: GPS IN THE MEDIEVAL LIBRARY

Books love to hide from us. While you were sure you put your current read on the kitchen table, it turns up next to your comfortable chair in the living room. As you handle more books at the same time, it becomes increasingly challenging

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Visit The Online Library of Babel: New Web Site Turns Borges’ “Library of Babel” Into a Virtual Reality

Jorge Luis Borges specialized in envisioning the unenvisionable: a map the same size as the land it depicts, an event whose possible outcomes all occur simultaneously, a single point in space containing all other points in space, a vast library containing all

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Artists in the Archives: A Collection of Card Catalogs

On a recent afternoon, Carla Rae Johnson riffled through an array of cards in one of the narrow wooden drawers of a card catalog at the Greenburgh Public Library. But she wasn’t doing research, and the cards she was examining had nothing to

Posted in DRAFT - Repeat

by Hugh McLeod

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