Blog Archives

Fresh Classification Enhances Access to William Gedney’s Work

  American photographer William Gedney is known for his documentary style images and intense night studies. He was under appreciated in his life; he taught at Pratt Institute until he was denied tenure in 1987. Gedney’s work drew acclaim in

Posted in Archives, Classification, Libraries, Uncategorized

The Prelinger Archives: The Way It Never Was

One of my favorite films is unlikely to screen at a film festival. Joan Avoids a Cold shows the stark and humiliating consequences of sharing food, open-sneezing and neglecting hand-washing. It’s among the approximately 11,000 digitized and videotape titles in The Prelinger

Posted in Archives, Cataloging, Classification, Preservation, Uncategorized

Metadata Matters: Spotify’s Spotty Data

https://www.billboard.com/articles/business/6836005/spotify-150-million-lawsuit-explained https://qz.com/1227434/spotify-just-hired-160-million-people-to-work-for-free/ Spotify, is leading music subscription service with over 70 million users and an $8 billion-plus valuation has recently put out an IPO to be traded publicly on the stock market.  The IPO has prompted the company to clean

Posted in Born Digital, Cataloging, Classification, Knowledge Structures, Open Data

There’s a Fungus Among Us…But What’s Its Name? On the Efforts to Catalog Mushrooms

By day, Californian Alan Rockefeller works in cybersecurity. But by…well, later in the day, he’s a mushroom hunter and cataloger, one of a few dedicated volunteers that keep mycology moving. Because mushroom taxonomy isn’t an especially new or sexy field,

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Posted in Cataloging, Classification

HOW WIKIPEDIA PORTRAYED HUMANITY IN A SINGLE PHOTO

IN 1972, CARL Sagan was preparing to send humans into space. The Pioneer missions were unmanned, sure—but NASA had asked Sagan to design a depiction of Earth’s inhabitants for the trip, just in case the spacecraft ran across some aliens.

Posted in Classification

Finding the Unexpected Wonder in More Than 22,000 International Standards

It can be hard to find the joy in the minutiae of ISO—pages upon pages of acronyms, meeting notes, nuts-and-bolts bureaucracy about actual nuts and bolts. But without it, and the standardization it provides, the world would be a significantly

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Posted in Classification

Organizing Pictures With Words

Posted in Cataloging, Classification

Improving Descriptive Practices for Born-Digital Material in an Archival Context

  Creating archival finding aids for born-digital that adequately express the quality, quantity, and usability of the material has been challenging for digital archives practitioners. This is partially due to the fact that existing national and international standards that guide

Posted in Archives, Born Digital, Cataloging, Classification, Libraries

Paul Otlet and the Universal Decimal Classification

In class a number of weeks ago we enjoyed watching the film entitled The Man Who Wanted to Classify the World.  Though the film has its flaws (mainly in production, but perhaps also in content as some other students have assessed)

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Posted in Classification, Knowledge Structures

The Man Who Classified Music

Meet the man classifying every genre of music on Spotify — all 1,387 of them Do you prefer ‘neurostep’ or ‘vapor house’? Spotify’s ‘data alchemist’ is using technology to help identify new musical trends. (Headline and photo from The Toronto

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Posted in Classification, Knowledge Structures

by Hugh McLeod

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Pratt Institute School of Information