Blog Archives

First Major Exhibit on Cornell University Witchcraft Collection

Out of the personal library of Cornell University’s cofounder Andrew Dickson White came the Cornell University Witchcraft Collection, which holds over 3,000 objects on superstition and witchcraft in Europe, mostly acquired in the 1880s. “He was interested in people on the margin and the

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Posted in Archives, Repeatable

New Website Envisions Borges’ “Library of Babel” Using Virtual Reality

Borges imagined the Library of Babel comprising a huge number of connected hexagonal rooms lined by bookshelves. “Each shelf contains thirty-five books of uniform format; each book is of four hundred and ten pages; each page, of forty lines, each

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Posted in Books, Knowledge Structures, Libraries, Library, Repeatable

The Internet’s Own Boy: The Story of Aaron Swartz

This documentary “depicts the life of American computer programmer, writer, political organizer and Internet activist Aaron Swartz. It features interviews with his family and friends as well as the internet luminaries who worked with him. The film tells his story up

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Posted in DRAFT - Repeat, Knowledge and Truth, Open Access, Open Data

The Metropolitan Museum of Art: 375,000 windows on art history, and that’s just the beginning

  Richard Knipel, the Wikimedian in residence at the Metropolitan Museum of Art, looks back at the efforts made and future plans to further support collaboration between the museum and the Wikimedia movement. By Richard Knipel, July 25th, 2017 Six months ago, I

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Posted in Museums, Open Data

Celebrate Open Access Week by adding open citations to Wikipedia

“Wikipedia is open access by nature, but it’s important that our citations be free to read as well” @JakeOrlowitz Open Access Week, now in its tenth year, supports research and publishing that is free for anyone to read or even

Posted in Uncategorized

‘How did the promise of the information age turn into the dystopia of the post-truth age?’

davidclarke.blog | discussions about knowledge, art and truth

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Posted in Knowledge Structures, Knowledge and Truth

Card Catalogs + The Secret History of Modernity: Observations by Tim Carmody

“Card catalogs feel very old but are shockingly new. Merchants stored letters and slips of paper on wire or thread in the Renaissance. (Our word “file” comes from filum, or wire.) But a whole technology, based on scientific principles, for storing,

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Posted in Cataloging, Libraries, Library

Is “Diversity” an Effective Anti-Racism Tactic in Library and Information Science? A Critique by David James Hudson

ABSTRACT Drawing on a range of critical race and anti-colonial writing, and focusing chiefly on Anglo-Western contexts of librarianship, this paper offers a broad critique of diversity as the dominant mode of anti-racism in LIS. After outlining diversity’s core tenets,

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Posted in Libraries, Library, Uncategorized

OCLC: replace FAST heading “Illegal aliens”

In July 2014, students and librarians from Dartmouth College submitted a proposal to change the Library of Congress Subject Heading (LCSH) Illegal aliens and associated headings such as Children of illegal aliens. LC rejected that proposal in December 2014. The American Library Association

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Posted in Cataloging, Classification, Libraries

This is what a 16th century e-reader looked like

It’s easy to take thousands of books on holiday with you these days thanks to the e-reader, a device that can store enough books to keep you reading for months. E-readers are especially great for people who like to read

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Posted in Books, Repeat

by Hugh McLeod

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Pratt Institute School of Information